Emmett Till () – Bio, Birthday, Family, Age & Born

Emmett Till

Emmett Louis Till was a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family’s grocery store. The brutality of his murder and the fact that his killers were acquitted drew attention to the long history of violent persecution of African Americans in the United States. Till posthumously became an icon of the civil rights movement. Till was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. During summer vacation in August 1955, he was visiting relatives near Money, in the Mississippi Delta region. He spoke to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, the white married proprietor of a small grocery store there. Although what happened at the store is a matter of dispute, Till was accused of flirting with or whistling at Bryant. In 1955, Bryant had testified that Till made physical and verbal advances. The jury did not hear Bryant’s testimony, due to the judge ruling it inadmissible.

Born: Emmett Louis Till, July 25, 1941, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Died: August 28, 1955, Money, Mississippi, U.S.
Cause of death: Lynching
Resting place: Burr Oak Cemetery, Alsip, Illinois
Education: James McCosh Elementary School
Parent(s): Mamie Carthan Till-Mobley, Louis Till

About Emmett Till

African-American youth who was beaten and murdered for talking to 21-year-old Carolyn Bryant, a white woman, in 1955. His murder and subsequent trial were pivotal events in the instigation of the African-American Civl Rights Movement and were covered heavily in the 1987 Emmy award-winning series Eyes on the Prize.

Before Fame

He attended McCosh Elementary School.

Achievement

Carolyn’s husband, Roy, and his half-brother Milam abducted 14-year-old Till, removed one of his eyes, and shot him before tying a 70-pound cotton gin fan to his neck with barbed wire and dumping him in the Tallahatchie River.

Family Life

His mother insisted that he had a public funeral with an open casket to publicize his death.

Associations

Bryant and Milam were acquitted of his murder, although they admitted to killing him in a magazine interview. The trial added momentum to the Civil Rights Movement, which was led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Information related to Emmett Till

  • 1920 Duluth lynchings – On June 15, 1920, three African-American circus workers, Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac McGhie, suspects in an assault case, were taken from jail and lynched by a white mob of thousands in Duluth, Minnesota.
  • Isaac Woodard – Isaac Woodard Jr. was a decorated African-American World War II veteran. On February 12, 1946, hours after being honorably discharged from the United States Army, he was attacked while still in uniform by South Carolina police as he was taking a bus home.
  • Louis Allen – Louis Allen was an African-American businessman in Liberty, Mississippi who was shot and killed on his land during the civil rights era.
  • Ossian Sweet – Ossian Sweet was an African-American physician in Detroit, Michigan. He is known for being charged with murder in 1925 after he and his friends used armed self-defense against a hostile white crowd protesting after Sweet moved into their neighborhood.
  • Scottsboro Boys – The Scottsboro Boys were nine African American teenagers, ages 13 to 19, falsely accused in Alabama of raping two white women on a train in 1931. The landmark set of legal cases from this incident dealt with racism and the right to a fair trial.
  • People murdered in Mississippi
  • African-American history of Mississippi
  • Burials in Illinois
  • History of civil rights in the United States
  • Racially motivated violence against African Americans
  • Murdered African-American people
  • Murdered American children

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Latest information about Emmett Till updated on August 27, 2020.


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